History

Committed to Service
ADCNC was initially incorporated in 1955 as the United Medical Research Foundation of North Carolina.  It was founded to support outreach into under-recognized health issues in our communities.  As alcoholism and addiction became an urgent concern, the agency refined its focus and changed its name to United Health Services for Alcohol and Drug Abuse (UHS).  Expanding its focus statewide, the agency began working on issues of access. In 1977, Dr. Jonnie H. McLeod, the renowned pediatrician and addiction advocate, presented UHS with an outstanding service award from the North Carolina Drug Commission.
The organization became the Alcohol / Drug Council of North Carolina in 1988.  Under the leadership of Anthony “Tony” Mulvihill, it became the state chapter for the National Council for Alcohol and Drug Dependence.  Guided by a dedicated Board of Directors, ADCNC emerged as one of the leading organizations working to address addiction in our state.

United Health Services for Alcohol and Drug Abuse became Alcohol Drug Council of North Carolina

United Health Services for Alcohol and Drug Abuse became Alcohol Drug Council of North Carolina

Advocating for Addicts and Alcoholics

Mr. Mulvihill became a tireless advocate for people who needed help.  A leader in establishing the North Carolina Substance Abuse Federation, he served as one of the group’s initial chairs.  He was an active member of Addiction Professionals of North Carolina.  They recognized this contribution by naming him the recipient of the 1994 Norbert L. Kelly Award.  His letters to policy makers regarding funding and news releases decrying a lack of services called attention to the need for prevention and treatment services.  Joe Six-Pack was known far and wide – he was the man who had no resources to get the addiction treatment he needed.  ADCNC hosted an Outerbanks Conference each year – and Tony pushed Board members and invited guests to tackle tough problems and make recommendations.  Substance abuse and criminal justice, medical services, Certificate of Need and career ladders for addiction professionals were only some of the issues examined.  Mr. Mulvihill served the agency with passion and commitment until his death in 2004.

"Tony" Mulvihill was our first Executive Director of ADCNC

“Tony” Mulvihill was our first Executive Director of ADCNC

Information and Referral Reaches Out
Lattie Baker became the ADCNC Executive Director shortly after the death of Mr. Mulvhill.  Mr. Baker was an experienced state leader, who had worked for the Department of Corrections for many years.  Lattie grew the Information and Referral Service for the agency, adding professional software and growing the database.  The services became offered via a toll-free hotline and linked to the national SAMHSA service for local referrals.  ADCNC continued its tradition of Outerbanks and hosted the premier of the HBO Addiction movie series.

Lattie Baker was our second ADCNC Executive Director. Outerbanks Conference 2006

Lattie Baker was our second ADCNC Executive Director. Outerbanks Conference 2006

Focus on Recovery
In 2007, Anne Doolen became the first Executive Director to speak openly about her own recovery.  Ms. Doolen was a well-known advocate for women’s addiction treatment and HIV services and the developer of a variety of specialty substance abuse programs in the medical setting of federally qualified community health centers.  Working with the Board, the agency expanded its peer recovery focus.  Presently over 100 years of recovery are represented by a number of representatives from the Board of Directors and staff.  Information and referall services for people who speak Spanish were added.  Pilot programs to offer internships for people through Vocational Rehabilitation and to provide vouchers for services to members of the North Carolina National Guard were created and elements have become integrated into permanent programs

Anne Doolen at Clam Digger Inn Hotel Outerbanks Conference 2010

Anne Doolen at Clam Digger Inn Hotel Outerbanks Conference 2010

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